© 2017 by Essence To Crux, etc.

Company Email: EssenceToCruxTheatre@gmail.com

Company Telephone: (770) 854-2117

Kallie Robinson: etc.Kallie@gmail.com

Kathryn May Latoni: etc.Kathryn@gmail.com

Pearl Oppenheimer: etc.Pearl@gmail.com

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Fri, Oct. 12th at 7:30pm
Sat, Oct. 13th at 7:30pm
Sun, Oct. 14th at 4pm
Fri, Oct. 19th at 7:30pm
Sat, Oct. 20th at 7:30pm
Sun, Oct.21st at 4pm

Our

Gallery

Essence To Crux (etc.) is producing Two Rooms by Lee Blessing with the Sautee Nacoochee Center for the Arts in November 2017 as a means to announce the beginning of their quest for a home in the Northeast Georgia Community.

Two Rooms follows the story of husband and wife, Michael and Lainie Wells. They are both American educators - Michael is a professor of History and Politics and Lainie a professor of Natural Science. They are teaching at a college in Beirut, Lebanon, when the Lebanese Civil War comes to a head and the Lebanese Hostage Crisis (1982 - 1992) begins. Michael is taken along with a colleague.

Upon Michael's capture, Lainie returns to their home in America. The two rooms that the title alludes to are the windowless cell in Beirut where Michael has been hidden and Michael's home office in America which Lainie has emptied of all furniture, "cleansed," and shut herself into with the intent to suffer with Michael. 

Within these two rooms, they write imaginary letters to one another and have imaginary conversations. Meanwhile, Lainie is also having very real conversations with the other two characters in the play: the first, an ambitious reporter by the name of Walker who hopes to persuade Lainie to speak out about what she feels has been the government's inaction and negligence so that his career may capitalize on her story, and the second, a cool, concise, and at times unfeeling State Department Official by the name of Ellen who has been trained to treat the situation with diplomacy, trying to make Lainie understand that Michael has now become one part of a much larger political equation and "simply going in and taking him" is not how this Civil War works.

The play follows these characters as months turn into years of waiting.

 In the end all of the characters must find their own peace with the fact that they have all done their best, and sometimes that does not result in what is right for all.